WELCOME TO ELEMENTO, A WARM, INVITING AND COLORFUL ATELIER OF SINGULAR HOME DESIGN. FOUNDED IN 1998 BY LEADING TEL AVIV BASED DESIGNER YOSSY GOLDBERG.

The brand’s distinctive one-of-a-kind pieces blend modern, high-quality materials and cutting-edge craftsmanship with an aesthetic inspired by the 1960s and 70’s. Elemento’s goal is to use luxury materials – including an incredibly rich collection of patterned, multicolored textiles – to create cozy and comfortable settings. The beauty of the brand is that it seamlessly blends into all environments, whether retro or contemporary, large or small, private or public. Goldberg’s designs have adorned individual homes and livened up public spaces including hotels, restaurants and offices, both locally and abroad. Elemento acts as a unique beacon of excellence that shines in a dark sea of machine-made, mass-manufactured industry prevalent in today’s world, and brings the focus back to the individual, human touch.

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Our Monthly Obsessions

Baoyan Children’s Entertainment Park, Beijing, China

Baoyan Park is a domestic brand chain store in China and is popular with its diversity of entertainment facilities and recreational areas, which contains indoor water park, Sims city, restaurant, cinema. The design by Shanghai-based X+Living interior design, changes the consumers’ moving path and realizes the separation of dry area and wet area.

With its soft and friendly colors, child-size scale and interesting surprises at every turn, the entire park is a magical fantasy world for children. With a playful and imaginative approach, the designers have created a space that is not just perfect for children but that also gives adults access to their own space and ideal vantage points where they can watch their kids having fun without worries.

The water park has a lot of soft colors, where the deep-water pool and wading and play areas are distinctly separate through color schemes.  
For the Mini city the designers created a creative world - a magic city with square and street in rich colors and blocks. These elements, including animal modeling and mechanical blocks, provide children with the basis of imagination and stimulate children to create their own stories in their minds

Say No Mo - Social Nail Bar, Kyiv

Say No Mo - Beauty Salon with beauty services, a fully licensed bar, café, social venue and luxury retail boutique, owned by Canadian lady, banded together to offer the most unique lifestyle experience. A smart space where you can rest, have fun, explore and express your personal kind of beauty.

Designed by the interior design firm Balbek bureau, Say No Mo is an impressive new gender-neutral beauty salon. The design of the salon is integral to how it functions as a beauty salon and an event space. The dominant materials are polished concrete on the floors and polished stainless-steel panels which flow around the walls, Striking gold walls add contrasting warmth and create a connection, the cool grey concrete is anything but typical for a beauty salon environment and the gold gives visual strength and adds a luminous quality.

At the center of the plan is a dual-purpose bar that converts from offering manicures to serving cocktails. It is wrapped in black metal—the rough welded joins left visible. The counter is made of 12mm composite material.

The soft furnishings are rounded and incorporate flowing curves, toning in with both the concrete and warm white walls.

 

Water Cherry House, Tokyo, Japan

Water Cherry House is a perfect example of the timelessness of design and seamless interaction with nature, evident in Japanese architecture and so spectacularly present in this house. A private residence completed several years ago, the work of Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, and his prolific office, Kengo Kuma Associates.

The villa is located in a national park on a coastal cliff close to Tokyo and the architectural master plan intended for the interior spaces to interact with the landscape. Seemingly weightless slanted roofs cover the wooden pathways that connect the various rooms. that is both traditionally Japanese, yet unquestionably modern.Various light-colored wood species, including ash, cedar and cypress, produce the subtle variety of the surfaces while the indirect light streaming through the wooden slats and rice-paper screens adds another layer of understated calm.

 

 

 

Projects